What do cave painting tell us?

Executed mainly in red and white with the occasional use of green and yellow, the paintings depict the lives and times of the people who lived in the caves, including scenes of childbirth, communal dancing and drinking, religious rites and burials, as well as indigenous animals.

What age is cave painting?

Cave art, generally, the numerous paintings and engravings found in caves and shelters dating back to the Ice Age (Upper Paleolithic), roughly between 40,000 and 14,000 years ago. See also rock art. The first painted cave acknowledged as being Paleolithic, meaning from the Stone Age, was Altamira in Spain.

Who painted the cave paintings?

Pablo Picasso

How do you make prehistoric paint?

Painting techniques The first paintings were cave paintings. Ancient peoples decorated walls of protected caves with paint made from dirt or charcoal mixed with spit or animal fat.

What are the three basic themes presented in the cave paintings?

Cave iconography is limited to three basic themes: animals, human figures and signs.

What are the five different types of cave art?

As stated at the beginning of this article, there are five different types of cave art: hand prints (including finger marks), abstract signs, figurative painting, engraving and relief sculpture. The last three are concerned with figurative works and, broadly speaking, follow similar themes.

What is the main theme of prehistoric paintings?

The most common themes in cave paintings are large wild animals, such as bison, horses, aurochs, and deer. Tracings of human hands and hand stencils were also very popular, as well as abstract patterns, called finger flutings.

What is the function of prehistoric paintings?

Prehistoric man found it effective to carve drawings in thier caves, establishing a new scribal culture. Drawing provided them with a way to communicate by recording visual images. They basically carved pictures that captured what they saw.

Which is the oldest method used for communication?

Visual storytelling

How did cavemen communicate with each other?

But our modern language still has some remnants of the grunting cavemen who came before us—words that linguists say might have been conserved for 15,000 years, the Washington Post reports. ... But this ancestral language was spoken and heard. People sitting around campfires used it to talk to each other.”