Why do you think Golding chose to set Lord of the Flies on an island and how does he use the island in the novel?

Lord of the Flies was written by William Golding in 1954. ... Golding uses the island as a microcosm for the real world, along with all the problems and realities faced in the world. He deliberately picked an island to be the landing place of the stranded boys because an island is isolated from the rest of society.

What problem does Jack believe is causing him to fail to kill a pig?

So, Jack is not able to kill the pig because killing is not something well bred and civilized people do, even young, impetuous boys. Jack is not hungry enough, desperate enough, or bloodthirsty enough to do it in the first chapter of the novel.

Why do Jack and Roger want to kill Ralph?

Expert Answers Hover for more information. In the novel Lord of the Flies, Jack Merridew wants to kill Ralph in chapter 12 because he has undergone the same slow and gradual breakdown of civilization that has affected all of the boys.

How is Piggy's death foreshadowed?

The death is foreshadowed in the early pages, when Piggy tells Ralph he has asthma, can't swim, needs his glasses to see, and is sick from the fruit. ... When Jack breaks one of the lenses in Piggy's glasses, the foreshadowing of his fragility is repeated, and his dependence on his glasses for survival.

How was Simons death foreshadowed?

During the confrontation in the previous chapter, the Lord of the Flies foreshadows Simon's death by promising to have some “fun” with him. ... Although Jesus and Simon both die sacrificial deaths, Jesus was killed for his beliefs, whereas Simon is killed because of the other boys' delusions.

What does Jack do to the pig?

After the boys savagely kill the pregnant sow, Jack proceeds to butcher the meat before severing the pig's head. He then instructs his hunters to sharpen a stick at both ends and jams the pig's severed head on top of the stake as a sacrifice to the beast.

Does Ralph kill Jack in Lord of the Flies?

He stumbles across the sow's head, the Lord of the Flies, now merely a gleaming white skull—as white as the conch shell, he notes. Angry and disgusted, Ralph knocks the skull to the ground and takes the stake it was impaled on to use as a weapon against Jack.

Who is the oldest in Lord of the Flies?

Ralph